BBC’s Clive Myrie bids sad farewell to colleague as Nigella Lawson admits ‘it’s our loss’

Clive Myrie and Nigella Lawson were two of the first to share their sadness over colleague Mark Urban’s departure from the BBC, after 35 years at the broadcaster. Mark has worked as the Middle Eastern correspondent for BBC News, as well as for Newsnight.

After Mark shared the news on X (formerly Twitter), Clive shared his announcement and wrote: “Very sad news and a big loss for us. Good luck Mark.”

The BBC’s top TV chef Nigella echoed Clive’s thoughts on the matter, telling Mark: “It’s our loss.” The star spoke out about his decision to quit on Sunday morning.

He tweeted: “Personal news, I’ll be leaving the BBC at the end of May.

“Newsnight in its current format will end then, so most posts will go. I decided not to apply for other BBC jobs. Working there for 35 yrs has been life defining: an eyewitness to history collaborating with such brilliant colleagues. But it’s time for a change.”

Mark showed his gratitude to both Nigella and Clive, as he was inundated with well-wishes from fans and celebrities alike.

He told the Nigella’s Cook, Eat, Repeat star: “your words mean a lot to me, thank you. hopefully I will find other ways to share my ramblings with the world”, to which Nigella wrote back: “We’re all counting on it.”

Mark then responded to Clive, admitting: “thank you very much Clive. It will be a wrench for me too, but it’s time.”

Emily Maitlis, who worked with Mark on Newsnight, also shared some kind words with him, writing: “Mark what a huge huge loss this will be. I so loved working with you. I am very sorry you are leaving – and your catchphrase will stay with us all forever .. xx.”

Mark’s exit comes after it was revealed Newsnight was facing a fight to stay on-air after losing half of its viewers, 30 staff, and having more than £7 million cut from its budget.

It was reported last year that the show, previously fronted by Emily Maitlis, would lose its reporters, be shortened by 10 minutes and drop its investigative films to focus on studio-based debates.

At the time, BBC News and Current Affairs CEO Deborah Turness said the broadcaster was “in a tough financial climate”, and had to make “some difficult choices” as audiences switch from TV to online news.

Jonathan Aspinwall was appointed as the show’s new editor, promising to “lead Newsnight as it evolves into a debate, discussion and an interview-based programme”.

Via

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