Beloved BBC radio star dies at 64 after battle with cancer as tributes pour in

BBC Radio executive Paul Chantler has died at the age of 64 following a short illness. Sources close to the much-loved executive have confirmed he died in Eastbourne General Hospital on Easter Sunday after battling a number of health issues.

“[Paul] died in Eastbourne General Hospital this afternoon, Easter Sunday, having been admitted last week with breathing difficulties. He had recently been diagnosed with liver cancer,” Radio Today reported.

Paul began his career working on Hospital Radio in Tunbridge Wells in 1971 and worked alongside Good Morning Britain’s Richard Gainsford. Richard paid tribute on his X account.

Alongside a picture of the pair together, he wrote: “Shocked to hear my old friend @PaulChantler has died. Like so many in our industry, I owe my first break in broadcasting to Paul. Not to mention nearly four decades of unwavering support & kindness. His legend lives on through his “Essential Media Law” books. Taken far too soon. X”

Other friends and colleagues were also quick to pay tribute. His Fix Radio colleague, Gerry Edwards commented: “Paul’s zest for exploring new and bold ideas transformed the landscape of radio in the UK and afar. He has left an indelible mark on the entire broadcasting industry. He will be profoundly missed, whilst his visionary legacy will continue to inspire.”

His Essential Media Law co-author Paul Hollins wrote: “Deeply saddened to share the news that my friend and co-author Paul Chantler has passed away after a short illness. Rest easy Paul and thanks for everything.”

Meanwhile, Jason Bryant, from Nation, opined: “Paul was a brilliant programmer, good friend and formidable lunch date. Though he loved the high life, best restaurants and travelling the world, Paul understood what the mass market wanted from their radio stations.

“Throughout his career, in music, news and talk, Paul had many successes. He loved creating great radio, coaching on-air talent and helped so many people to reach their potential. Paul, you leave a great legacy – I will miss you, our chats and our lunches and I have no doubt the next part of your journey will be in First Class.” (sic)

Over the years, Paul worked for a range of stations including the BBC, Chiltern Radio, Essex Radio, and Wireless Group. As well as working as a radio executive, he was also a Journalist, Entrepreneur, Media Law Expert, Director, and Author. He wrote a number of industry guides that outlined good practices in the audio world.

He was the co-writer of Essential Media Law, which is regarded by many as a ‘go-to’ guide covering libel and defamation law in terms of radio broadcasts. The most recent edition includes a preface by LBC’s Nick Ferrari.

Paul was made a Radio Academy Fellow in recent years and had recently moved to a new apartment in Eastbourne after deciding on a change of life.

In February, just weeks before his death, he visited Thailand and looked happy and relaxed in pictures posted to social media.

Just a fortnight ago he was expressing his excitement about the forthcoming Netflix film Scoop about the infamous Newsnight interview with Prince Andrew.

“Fantastic trailer. @SamMcAlister1 is dogged, determined – and this brilliant drama will show it!” he wrote on X.

Via

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