Botched star makes history with BBL as doctor says ‘I’ve never seen anything like it’

WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT BELOW

Recent episodes of Botched, a reality TV show featuring plastic surgery disasters, had one participant who gave the show’s doctors quite a shock.

Sammy Krieger, a social media influencer from Oregon, came on the show to get the perfect breasts but it was her bum that got all the attention.

Sammy had undergone many Brazilian Butt Lift procedures and revealed she felt her breasts were growing in opposite directions.

The doctors, Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif, were shocked by the sight of her extraordinarily large bum.

Dr Nassif even said: “I don’t think I’ve ever seen something manmade like that.”

Read More: Botched’s Terry Dubrow says Paul has ‘loosened up’ after 24-year friendship

It appears Sammy is aiming for a look similar to Kim Kardashian’s, known for her small waist and prominent backside.

The official Botched Instagram account teased their audience with a clip of Sammy’s episode captioned: “This shark is asking the Botched docs for another BBL in return for a fire Instagram post.”

Fans praised Sammy’s stunning appearance, with one saying: “She looks amazing. Most importantly it’s about how she feels. That’s literally all that matters. Happy people don’t hate on others.”

However, one critic complained: “Don’t like the clout chasers on this show! Love it when they help someone in genuine need.”

And another added: “Just to clarify, the doctor has either not spent much time here or not at all to talk about women’s behinds here.

“Oregon is a state with thousands of gorgeous women, young and old, who focus on healthy living, fitness and outdoor activities which enables us to obtain outstanding booties naturally.”

Sammy has 5.4 million Instagram followers and recently wowed them with a photo of herself in a tiny faux-Chanel bikini.

Via

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