London suburb dubbed ‘open air asylum’ where you’re ‘hit with stench of rubbish’

A London suburb has been slammed as an ‘open air asylum’ that ‘refuses to improve’. The suburb of Burnt Oak was labelled as the ‘armpit’ of North West London in a brutal review online.

An aggrieved resident shared their dissatisfaction on satire website iLiveHere. The anonymous local described his neighbourhood disparagingly as an “open air asylum” that stubbornly “refuses to improve”.

Their critical post begins with a sharp analogy: “Burnt Oak is the body odour of North West London”. The exasperated North West Londoner continued their rant, warning people of what they think the area is like. They tell any “unfortunate” visitors who find themselves in Burnt Oak to take immediate shelter.

They claimed that despite its history, it is not worth visitors time, reports MyLondon.

Upon exiting the tube station – one the user describes as a strong contender for London’s worst – you are hit apparently by some disagreeable elements, they warned. 

“The moment you step outside the Tube station – which is in the running for worst tube station in London – you are immediately hit with the stench of rubbish, dead pigeons and the overwhelming feeling of imminent stabbings,” they wrote.

“It simply refuses to improve. From the lamppost decorations to the murals and street art, they all fall on deaf ears as you get asked for weed the moment you venture into the depths of this s***hole.”

The article sharply concludes that while Colindale and Edgware are on the up, Burnt Oak seems stuck “in its own time zone”.

In response to these harsh words, Burnt Oak locals will likely be eager to defend their neighbourhood. It boasts a prime location on the Northern line, offering superb connections to Camden, Euston, and the heart of London.

Moreover, residents enjoy the splendid Montrose Park at their doorstep and several country parks within easy reach.

SOURCE

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