The unlikely country 6,230 miles from UK where the most Channel migrants are from

More Channel migrants have come from Vietnam this year than any other country, according to new data.

The surge in Vietnamese migrants has been blamed by Downing Street for contributing to the record numbers of crossings this year.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman cited the “increasing number of Vietnamese” as why the Government’s Rwanda Bill needed to be passed by Parliament as soon as possible.

The number of Vietnamese crossing the Channel more than doubled last year from 505 in 2022 to 1,323, reports The Telegraph.

A crackdown on lorry security came after a tragedy in 2019 that saw 39 Vietnamese migrants – 31 men and 8 women – die in a refrigerator lorry trailer in Essex.

And since then there’s been more Vietnamese migrants who are risking crossing the Channel by boats packing with up to 20 people rather than reaching the UK by road.

Vietnamese migrants are often trafficked to the UK by gangs to work illegally in nail bars and restaurants. They are also found working in the sex trade and cannabis farms.

James Cleverly, the Home Secretary, spoke to his Vietnamese counterpart on Monday about the issue of soaring Vietnamese migrants.

A new agreement with the country will now attempt to curb the flow of migrants from Vietnam and a new social media campaign is highlighting the risks of making the journey illegally by boat.

Meanwhile The House of Lords sent the Safety of Rwanda Bill back to the lower house with a selection of suggested amendments as MPs returned from Easter recess this week, with Conservatives attempting to recover from a slew of defeats.

But ministers have slammed the House of Lords’ attempts to water down the plan and render it “totally pointless” as they set up a fresh showdown with unelected Peers.

Tonight they overturned their amendments, paving the way for Mr Sunak’s Bill to potentially pass Parliament later this week.

Illegal Migration Minister Michael Tomlinson said: “Here we are, back again debating the issues that we have already rejected.

“We’re not quite at the point of completing each other’s sentences, but we’re almost there. We simply cannot accept amendments that allow for loopholes which would perpetuate the current cycle of delays and late legal challenges to removal.

“We have a moral duty to stop the boats. We must bring to an end the dangerous, unnecessary and illegal methods that are being deployed.

“We must protect our borders and most importantly, save lives at sea. Our partnership with Rwanda is a key part of that.”

SOURCE

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