Diesel drivers can increase fuel economy ‘by 10 percent’ this Christmas with easy hack

Petrol and diesel owners can boost their fuel economy by a staggering 10 percent with a quick fix today, according to experts.

Simply cleaning excess dirt from a vehicle will create less drag and have a major impact on fuel usage.

Specialists at ATS Euromaster claimed that having a clean car was not just a myth with road users expected to make savings.

They said: “The original theory was that if your car is dirty, it will reduce drag. The dirt creates dimples on the car, likened to those of a golf ball, which increases the aerodynamics of the car.

“However, later studies showed that the dirt particles will generate more drag — and could reduce your fuel economy by up to 10 percent.”

Back in October, Select Car Leasing also warned dirt adds weight which will play a factor in how much fuel is used. They suggested grimy surfaces will limit airflow and increase friction which will generate a lower mpg rating.

The group predicted road users could likely save a staggering £200 per annum by simply keeping on top of their cleaning.

They explained: “A cleaner car is in fact more fuel efficient. Experiments found the vehicle was more fuel-efficient when clean, averaging two miles per gallon (mpg) more than when it was dirty.

“The average fuel mileage of the dirty car fell to around 24 mpg, while the clean car was 26 mpg.

“If you extrapolate that over an entire year, and with a driver covering around 8,000 miles, there’s a potential saving of around £200 annually just by keeping your car clean.

“The main determining factor here is when the car doesn’t have dirt around it, it is much more aerodynamic. The surface area of a vehicle can impact mileage and fuel efficiency because when it has no debris, it can travel through the air much easier and freely.”

The warning comes as fuel prices remain high after gradual increases at forecourts across the UK.

According to RAC Fuel Watch, unleaded petrol was recorded at 153.3p per litre, up from 143 pence back in June.

Meanwhile, diesel costs have risen to a whopping 160p per litre despite standing at just 144.3 pence as soon back as August.

Source

Leave a Comment