Albares conveys to the Argentine ambassador “the demand for public rectification” for Milei's accusations

A public correction. This is what the Minister of Foreign Affairs, José Manuel Albares, has personally demanded from the Argentine Ambassador to Spain, Roberto Bosch. “During the meeting,” diplomatic sources explain, “Yesterday, Sunday, Minister Albares conveyed to the Argentine ambassador the demand for a public correction of Javier Milei's words.”

The Argentine leader's words are the same ones he spoke during the rally he offered this Sunday in Madrid with Vox, in which he also “corrupt“To his wife, Begoña Gómez.

“The meeting,” the sources continued, “took place within the channels of respect and diplomatic courtesy that both the government and the minister maintain at all times.”

The meeting took place at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Monday morning at the request of Albares. The meeting took place after Spain summoned the Spanish Ambassador to Argentina for consultations as a first response to Milei's speech, which, according to what the President of the Government, Pedro Sánchez, stated this morning, was out of order: “Accordingly”, Sánchez added: “The Spanish government's response will be in accordance with the dignity that Spanish democracy represents and the bonds of brotherhood that unite Spain and Argentina.”

Milei's government rules out apologies

The government of Argentina believes that the unusual diplomatic crisis that has started with the Spanish executive is not that, but rather “a personal disagreement between the presidents”, following Javier Milei's attack on Pedro Sánchez, during the rally he offered this Sunday in Madridin which he alsocorrupt“To his wife, Begoña Gómez. Manuel Adorni, spokesman for the Argentine government, assured this on Monday Milei also rules out asking for the apology demanded by the Spanish government.

“Common sense indicates that there can be no diplomatic response, there is no reason for that,” the Argentine spokesperson said in response to the question whether they are concerned about the measures that the government may take. “It would be absolutely irrational,” he said, if Spain were to take another step if Milei did not apologize, something he ruled out for now. However, Argentina is asking that Sánchez be the one to apologize 'if necessary'.

Milei's words moved the government call the Spanish ambassador in Buenos Aires for consultation. The measure, unprecedented in relations between the two countries, was supported by all political parties except the PP and Vox, as well as by the EU foreign affairs official, Josep Borrell.

However, the government of Argentina believes that these are “impulsive” actions and does not understand the reason for the Spanish reaction and assures that it is Sánchez who must publicly apologize to Milei. Spokesman Adorni assured from Buenos Aires that what happened “has nothing to do with diplomatic relations” and that it concerns personal differences between the two leaders. “There is no diplomatic problem here,” he said.

Adorni has referred to the crisis that arose at the beginning of this month following the words of Minister Óscar Puente, in which he spoke of “the substances that Milei supposedly consumed”, the spokesperson recalled, or when “Sánchez defined us as -right-wing and anti-democratic .”, to argue that “we have never emphasized diplomatic relations.”

“It seems to me that there is great confusion within the Spanish government,” the Argentine spokesman said. “If they think that President Milei is using substances, referring to drugs or that we are haters, to say that we are anti-democratic, plus a whole bunch of insults, they are clearly confused.” Adorni added that “despite so many insults, grievances and disqualifications by the Spanish government, we have never maintained diplomatic relations.”

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