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Nogueras reminds Sánchez that he depends on Junts and asks him to be “more intelligent” and “responsible” in Catalonia

Junts in Congress spokesperson Míriam Nogueras asked Pedro Sánchez this Wednesday for “more intelligence” than “cunning” and “greater responsibility” after reminding him that neither the PSOE nor the PSC have the numbers to compete alone in Spain and rule Catalonia. . “To be able to govern in Spain and Barcelona, ​​​​or to try to govern in Catalonia, you need the number of others. “He doesn't have enough of himself,” Nogueras said in the middle of negotiations over the inauguration of the government presidentafter Socialist candidate Salvador Illa won the May 12 elections, leaving with 42 deputies, ahead of Carles Puigdemont with 35.

“You lost the July 23 elections and today you remain in office as a minority,” the deputy stated. “It has a worse position in Catalonia than here. And here he has fallen by the wayside,” warned Nogueras, who used his usual harsh tone against the president at the start of his speech, accusing him of “participating” in the law rate against the supporters of independence and the 'confusing' of general interests with personal interests.

Nogueras has indicated that he would not comment on whether or not Sánchez's consideration was “a small act”, although he has stated that he feels that “he has already gotten over it”. “A leader must be mentally strong, and that seems to be the case,” said the deputy, who has asked that the pause not remain “just an electoral strategy.” “It must be translated into real changes that serve to protect us from practices that the Spanish fanatical right has introduced and that have only had the will to change when even one drop of this dung heap has touched you,” he emphasized.

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