Tesla preparing to launch its largest Supercharger site in the world

You might think Tesla’s largest Supercharger site would be in California, or perhaps even China, but certainly not a place called Yeehaw Junction in Florida.

According to X (formerly known as Twitter) user MarcoRP, however, that’s exactly where the record-setting location will be.

A development application shared by MarcoRP shows the location will have 200 charging stalls: 160 of Tesla’s Prefabricated Supercharger Units (PSUs); plus 40 standalone stalls, eight of which are for trailers.

It’s unclear if the site will exclusively use Tesla’s new V4 Superchargers, which are capable of charging at up to 250kW, but it will reportedly open in three phases.

It’s also unclear if it will feature a solar canopy to provide power, though given how sunny Florida is this would seem like a wise idea.

While Yeehaw Junction is in the middle of a rural part of Florida and quite a distance from major cities like Orlando or Miami, it’s where three major highways converge.

Should development go ahead as planned, the Florida Supercharger location will eclipse a planned California location previously touted as the world’s largest.

As seen in a development application filed in California, a new location in Lost Hills – 2.5 hours north of Los Angeles – will feature 164 charging stalls, all covered by solar panels.

At present, the location with the most Tesla Superchargers is located in Coalinga, California, which has 98 individual charging stalls. That’s quite a bit more than the 16 at Australia’s largest, located in Albury, New South Wales.

The world’s largest EV charging station isn’t a Tesla Supercharger location.

A Shell facility 2.5km from Shenzhen Airport in China claimed the record last year with 258 public fast-charging points, only to be pipped later in 2023 by a location in Merklingen, Germany with a total of 259 charging points.

MORE: Everything Tesla

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