Vox considers regional governments broken after PP accepted reception of 347 minor migrants

Vox announced late Wednesday that it considers all the autonomous agreements it has signed with the PP to be broken. The reason was the dispersal through the various autonomous communities of unaccompanied immigrant minors that the far-right party refuses to accept and that Alberto Núñez Feijóo's party ended up supporting during the meeting of the Sectoral Conference on Childhood and Adolescence held last Wednesday, in which the reform of the Aliens Act for the reception of minors was discussed.

This Wednesday’s meeting concluded with a minimum pact in which the PP commits to unblocking a distribution of 347 minors, but leaves the decision on whether this is mandatory for another time. It is estimated that the Canary Islands would have to transfer 2,000 minors.

The formation led by Santiago Abascal issued a statement this Wednesday announcing the call of the “urgent” National Executive Committee to reach an agreement on the next decisions to be taken.

“Vox accuses Feijóo of having violated the regional government treaties by forcing the regional presidents to vote ‘yes’ to the distribution of migrant minors. The far-right formation points out that this decision comes after “the transfer of the CGPJ, RTVE, the Electoral Council or the formation of an alliance in Europe”, referring to the pacts of the PP and PSOE. “It is Mr. Núñez Feijóo who has broken the coalition governments”, the statement reads.

“The PP regional presidents have unilaterally followed Feijóo’s orders, without taking into account their government partner and not even complying with their own manifest and committed will in the internal discussions that have been held in recent weeks,” Vox accuses in the note. The statement concludes with an announcement of the leadership meeting to “agree on the next steps.”

Last year, all the autonomous communities agreed to distribute 373 minors from the Canary Islands and Ceuta, financed by the central executive with a total of 20 million euros. But The majority of the autonomous communities did not comply with the agreements and did not have a single child under the non-binding pact..

The threat to break these agreements between the PP and Vox has been latent since last Monday, when far-right leader Santiago Abascal announced it during an appearance at Vox headquarters, declaring: “We will abandon those governments immediately. 'We will not be accomplices in robberies, machetes and rapes' he claimed.

The statement issued this Wednesday maintains the same rhetoric of threats made since the beginning of the week.

Since then, the tension between the two formations has not ceased. That same morning, the vice-president of the Junta de Castilla y León, Juan García-Gallardo, warned that he would resign if the regional president, Alfonso Fernández Mañueco, of the PP, bowed to the wishes of the central government and his party gave in to the immigration policy. During his appearance in the Cortes, he assured that he had “an infinitely greater love” for his principles than for his position in the autonomous government. “These are not warnings or threats. For us it is essential to take strong action against illegal immigration,” he said.

Castilla y León was the first government pact that Vox signed with the PP. Later, similar people arrived in Aragon; Balearics -where they only offer support, but are not within the Executive-; the Valencian Community; the Region of Murcia and Extremadura, all led by the PP.

Abascal's party, which has made immigration policy its main banner against the government of Pedro Sánchez, has not cared about curbing the crisis humanitarian emergency which mainly registers the Canary Islands, but also Ceuta, due to the massive arrival of thousands of these young migrants who Vox accuses of being the architects of robberies, crimes and rapes, and of sowing chaos in the streets.

Precisely one of the first regional presidents to make it clear that immigration policy should be left 'outside the partisan struggle' and to ask for help to alleviate the situation was the president of the city of Ceuta, Juan Vives, of the PP. Also The Andalusian government, presided over by Juan Manuel Moreno, was open to the measurealthough both have demanded more money and aid to cope with the extreme situation.

Feijóo's speech changes

Over the past few days, the PP has changed his speech, confusing his far-right partners. Those of Alberto Núñez Feijóo went from first offering “solidarity” to later joining Vox’s idea that the government deploy naval vessels in the Atlantic Ocean to prevent the departure of canoes to our shores. In the end, however, they agreed to abide by the government’s directives, ignoring the threats of Abascal, who has not stopped accusing the PP of “defrauding” its voters.

That same morning, PP spokesman Borja Sémper made a final appeal to his far-right partners not to break up the regional governments and to accept the acceptance of minor migrants from the Canary Islands. “Stability is guaranteed with Vox,” he said in an interview on Onda Cero. “We want these governments not to break. Management and stability will be damaged,” he added. “I bet and dream of the stability that the Spanish government does not have, and that the autonomous communities continue to provide that stability,” he stressed.

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