Kung Fu Panda 4, Argylle, Netflix’s The Bricklayer, and every new movie to watch this weekend

Greetings, Polygon readers! Each week, we round up the most notable new releases to streaming and VOD, highlighting the biggest and best new movies for you to watch at home.

This week, Kung Fu Panda 4, the new animated action comedy starring Jack Black, arrives on VOD following its theatrical run last month. There’s tons of other exciting releases this week, too, like the satirical spy thriller Argylle on Apple TV Plus, a new action thriller starring Aaron Eckhart as a former CIA agent landing on Netflix, the new romantic fantasy film The Greatest Hits on Hulu, and much more. And then there’s Mayhem!, one of the best action movies of the year so far, now streaming on AMC Plus.

Here’s everything new that’s available to watch this weekend!


New on Netflix

Strange Way of Life

Where to watch: Available to stream on Netflix

Image: El Deseo/Saint Laurent Productions

Genre: Western drama
Run time: 31m
Director: Pedro Almodóvar
Cast: Ethan Hawke, Pedro Pascal

This Western short from legendary Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar (Volver, Pain and Glory) follows the story of two gunslingers (and former lovers) who reunite after 25 years apart.

The Bricklayer

Where to watch: Available to stream on Netflix

Image: Millennium Media/Vertical Entertainment

Genre: Action thriller
Run time: 1h 50m
Director: Renny Harlin
Cast: Aaron Eckhart, Nina Dobrev, Tim Blake Nelson

The latest in a long tradition of “action movies with odd profession titles,” The Bricklayer follows a former CIA agent (Aaron Eckhart) needed by his former agency when journalists start dying. The movie has a bit of pedigree behind it, as Renny Harlin (Cliffhanger, Die Hard 2) directs.

New on Hulu

The Greatest Hits

Where to watch: Available to stream on Hulu

A man staring across at a woman in front of a shelf of vinyl records. Image: Groundswell Productions/Searchlight Pictures

Genre: Musical romance
Run time: 1h 34m
Director: Ned Benson
Cast: Lucy Boynton, Justin H. Min, David Corenswet

After suffering the loss of her boyfriend in a car accident, a young woman named Harriet (Lucy Boynton) inadvertently discovers that she has the power to go back in time to various points in their relationship by listening to his old record collection. When Harriet meets a new love interest named David (Justin H. Min), she struggles between her desire to correct the past to resurrect her boyfriend or pursue the possibility of newfound love in the present.

New on Prime Video

The Exorcist: Believer

Where to watch: Available to stream on Prime Video

Two possessed, scarred and bruised children sit back to back on the floor and glare at the camera above them in The Exorcist: Believer Image: Universal Studios

Genre: Horror
Run time: 1h 51m
Director: David Gordon Green
Cast: Leslie Odom Jr., Ellen Burstyn, Ann Dowd

David Gordon Green’s new entry in the Exorcist franchise arrives this week on streaming. It’s a bizarre twist on the franchise, per our review:

Up until this most recent movie, the title The Exorcist carried some weight. While its role as a representation of quality was up for debate, its mark as a sign of ambition was not. Since the original Exorcist, the series has provided some of American cinema’s best and most interesting artists with space to ruminate on faith and evil. Believer lacks the ambition that’s meant to define an Exorcist movie. This is the most profound statement the movie has to offer, seemingly by accident: If the result of moving past God is that everything in the world will feel as empty and pointless as The Exorcist: Believer, we should cling to faith forever.

New on Apple TV Plus

Argylle

Where to watch: Available to stream on Apple TV Plus

A man with a buzzcut dressed in a emerald suit lifts a woman with short blonde hair in a gold dress and heels on a dance floor. Photo: Peter Mountain/Universal Pictures/Apple Original Films/Marv

Genre: Action comedy
Run time: 2h 19m
Director: Matthew Vaughn
Cast: Henry Cavill, Bryce Dallas Howard, Sam Rockwell

What happens when you take the meta-fictional irreverence of Stranger than Fiction and smash it together with a premise similar to Matthew Vaughn’s 2014 movie Kingsman: The Secret Service?

You get Argylle, an action satire of spy novels à la 1984’s Romancing the Stone that follows Elly Conway (Bryce Dallas Howard), an introverted novelist who is dragged kicking and screaming into a world of international espionage when it turns out that her popular spy novels are predicting the future. Who is the real agent Argylle? You’ll have to watch in order to find out.

From our review:

Argylle is too winking, too keen to show that it’s in on its own joke, to admit any real romantic feeling or any excitement that runs deeper than the surface level of its flashy choreography. Vaughn, the impish ringmaster, delights in challenging the audience to figure out what’s real and what’s fictional within his stylized, nested worlds. It’s just that he never really answers the question: Why should we care? With Argylle, he mounts a playful, rollicking thriller with an all-star cast and some dazzling action — but then holds the audience at arm’s length from it, just to show how clever he’s been in putting it together. The truly clever thing would have been to let the dumb film be joyously dumb, and invite the audience to lose themselves in it instead.

New on Peacock

Drive-Away Dolls

Where to watch: Available to stream on Peacock

Margaret Qualley and Geraldine Viswanathan looking into a trunk in Drive-Away Dolls Image: Focus Features

Genre: Road comedy
Run time: 1h 24m
Director: Ethan Coen
Cast: Margaret Qualley, Geraldine Viswanathan, Beanie Feldstein

Ethan Coen’s first narrative feature without his brother Joel is an offbeat crime comedy about a pair of young women who embark on an impromptu road trip. Things get dicey after the two cross paths with a group of incompetent criminals sent to retrieve a mysterious briefcase on behalf of their shady employer.

From our review:

Drive-Away Dolls’ well-worn beats are buttressed by tremendous style, a deep care taken with the film’s production and costume design. All that attention to the era that isn’t fully present in the script comes out in the visuals instead. There isn’t much narrative texture to Marian and Jamie’s various stopovers — in particular, there isn’t much for Jamie or Marian to connect with. While the pair have frequent and funny interactions on their trip, the people they meet are more or less cartoon characters setting up a gag.

New on Paramount Plus

Bob Marley: One Love

Where to watch: Available to stream on Paramount Plus, MGM Plus

A smiling man with dreadlocks standing next to a band of musicians playing. Image: Paramount Pictures

Genre: Biographical musical
Run time: 1h 47m
Director: Reinaldo Marcus Green
Cast: Kingsley Ben-Adir, Lashana Lynch, James Norton

This biopic follows the story of cultural icon Bob Marley, portrayed by Kingsley Ben-Adir (One Night in Miami…). The film follows Marley from his rise to fame in the ’70s up until his death in 1981.

New on AMC Plus

Mayhem!

Where to watch: Available to stream on AMC Plus

Nassim Lyes as Sam, an ex-con and former martial artist, fighting against two men in Mayhem. Image: IFC Films

Genre: Action thriller
Run time: 1h 49m
Director: Xavier Gens
Cast: Nassim Lyes, Loryn Nounay, Olivier Gourmet

An early contender for one of this year’s best action films, Mayhem follows Samir (Nassim Lyes), an ex-con and martial artist, who flees from France to Thailand to escape his former gang. Struggling to build a new life, Samir finds himself once again dragged into a world of deceit and violence when a powerful real estate tycoon kidnaps a member of his family.

From our review:

Mayhem’s action is brutal and kinetic, with inventive kills, strong location work, and realistic choreography that makes the most of Lyes’ kickboxing pedigree. It’s a true star-making performance for him, as he juggles the role’s demanding physical requirements with a deep well of sorrow that permeates the entire affair, even as he dispatches foe after foe.

New to rent

Ennio

Where to watch: Available to rent on Amazon, Apple, and Vudu

Ennio Morricone standing in his office surrounded by notes. Image: Music Box Films

Genre: Documentary
Run time: 2h 36m
Director: Giuseppe Tornatore

Cinema Paradiso director Giuseppe Tornatore made a documentary on renowned film composer Ennio Morricone, one of the most accomplished people in that stacked field. The documentary includes Quentin Tarantino, Clint Eastwood, Bruce Springsteen, and many more luminaries from the entertainment world.

Glitter & Doom

Where to watch: Available to rent on Amazon, Apple, and Vudu

Two men embracing on a stage surrounded by dancers. Image: SPEAK Productions/Music Box Films

Genre: Musical romance
Run time: 1h 55m
Director: Tom Gustafson
Cast: Alex Diaz, Alan Cammish, Ming-Na Wen

A musical set to the songs of the Indigo Girls, Glitter & Doom follows a summer romance between a musician committed to this craft (Alan Cammish) and a “free-spirited circus kid” (Alex Diaz).

Io Capitano

Where to watch: Available to rent on Apple and Vudu

A boy in a soccer jersey holding the hand of a floating woman dressed in an emerald shroud through the desert. Image: Archimede/Cohen Media Group

Genre: Fantasy
Run time: 2h 1m
Director: Matteo Garrone
Cast: Seydou Sarr, Moustapha Fall, Issaka Sawadogo

Desperate for an escape out of poverty, two cousins leave their hometown of Dakar, Senegal, to journey to Italy in search of a better life. Trekking across the hazards of the Sahara Desert and Mediterranean Ocean, the pair are met with sights and wonders beyond their wildest imaginations.

Kung Fu Panda 4

Where to watch: Available to rent on Amazon, Apple, and Vudu

Po the panda watches in awe as a svelte silver fox leaps over him, holding some stolen treasures Image: DreamWorks Animation

Genre: Martial arts comedy
Run time: 1h 34m
Director: Mike Mitchell
Cast: Jack Black, Awkwafina, Bryan Cranston

The fourth entry in the Kung Fu Panda saga sees Po taking on a new apprentice to succeed him as the Dragon Warrior. When a mysterious sorceress plots to resurrect Po’s past adversaries, he’ll need to call upon all his strength and allies to save the day.

From our review:

While the individual scenes and moments in Kung Fu Panda 4 are entertaining (and sometimes even great), it never quite gels as an enjoyable movie on its own. The message of change tying it together is flimsy, and the plot feels strung along, trying to get the characters in the right place to launch a few seconds of cool action. After four movies, it isn’t really a surprise that the Kung Fu Panda machine is running out of steam — thankfully, though, it has just enough power left to churn out some genuine laughs at the end.

One Life

Where to watch: Available to rent on Amazon, Apple, and Vudu

Photo: Peter Mountain/Bleecker Street

Genre: Biographical drama
Run time: 1h 50m
Director: James Hawes
Cast: Anthony Hopkins, Helena Bonham Carter, Johnny Flynn

Anthony Hopkins stars in a dramatization of the life of Sir Nicholas “Nicky” Winton, a London broker and humanitarian who rescued the lives of 669 Jewish children in the months leading up to World War II. Hopkins portrays Winton in his late ’70s, while actor-musician Johnny Flynn portrays him during his youth in the late 1930s.

Sleeping Dogs

Where to watch: Available to rent on Amazon, Apple, and Vudu

A man wearing a hairnet holding a puzzle piece while staring at a glass table of puzzle pieces. Image: Nickel City Productions/The Avenue

Genre: Crime thriller
Run time: 1h 50m
Director: Adam Cooper
Cast: Russell Crowe, Karen Gillan, Marton Csokas

After being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, retired homicide detective Roy Freeman (Russell Crowe) is motivated to reopen an investigation into the murder of a college professor when a mysterious new witness comes forward with a compelling piece of evidence. As he works to track down the true culprit, he’ll have to fight to convince those around him to trust his intuition and theories.

Via

Leave a Comment

ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT ArT