Beautiful city set to ‘ban tourists’ after ‘out of control behaviour’

The city of Kyoto’s Gion district is home to the city’s world-famous Geishas. Geishas are characterised by their traditional appearance, dress and their dancing.

The area attracts throngs of tourists from all over the world every year, but due to multiple reports of harassment by tourists, certain areas of the Gion district are being closed off.

Private alleyways, and some tea houses and restaurants will be entirely cut off from tourists, in order to protect the dancers.

The move has split opinions with some welcoming the move, as a means of preserving the dignity of the Geisha and protecting local culture. While others believe it is an overbearing misstep.

Speaking to German outlet Deutsche Welle, two Dutch tourists Anna and Mark Van Diggenen, Anna said: “I think it’s very good to ban taking pictures here in the area.”

Mark added that it was an welcome move to ensure “the privacy of the girls”.

However, this outlook wasn’t universally shared. Australian tourist Jane Stafford said: “I wonder why this being enforced? To me this is a unique heritage area, I guess, that people want to enjoy and [they] like to photograph the architecture.”

So, if you’re planning a trip to Kyoto, be aware of the new rules in the Gion district. Nevertheless, the city still has plenty to offer.

For example, the Kinkakuji Temple is a huge draw for those visiting the city.

One reviewer took to Tripadvisor to say of the religious site: “You have to see Kinkakuji if you are in Kyoto – you absolutely have to! It’s the most beautiful building I’ve ever seen – it’s hard to describe how picturesque it is. The perfection of the temple and it’s surrounds and the reflection on the water is breathtaking.”

Another said: “An absolutely gorgeous temple and viewing experience that is a must for everyone in the area. Albeit paid entry, it is definitely worth it!”

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