MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MLB MLB MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL MBL

Top BBC presenter quits after 35 years amid budget cuts and calls for show to be axed

BBC News presenter Mark Urban has announced his decision to leave the broadcaster after 35 years on the channel. He shared on X, formerly known as Twitter on Sunday morning: “Personal news, I’ll be leaving the BBC at the end of May.

“Newsnight in its current format will end then, so most posts will go. I decided not to apply for other BBC jobs. Working there for 35 yrs has been life defining: an eyewitness to history collaborating with such brilliant colleagues. But it’s time for a change.”

The 63-year-old has been a regular on Newsnight and has also worked on BBC News as the broadcaster’s Middle East correspondent.

Mark’s loyal followers rushed to the comments section to wish him well for his future endeavours as well as express their sadness about his departure.

One social media user penned: “Another huge loss for the BBC. Mark, you remain a journalistic legend whatever you do next or wherever you go.”

Another BBC viewer expressed: “Oh Mark. What an enormous loss for the BBC, and a nation of viewers. You are the best of the best and I consider myself so lucky to have worked with you. Look forward to seeing what you do next xxx”

Somebody else said: “Best wishes for the future. And thanks for your knowledge and insights and bringing quality journalism to the BBC.”

While a fourth added: “Very sorry to hear you’re leaving the #BBC, and very sorry about the end of #Newsnight which for decades was my favourite UK news format!

“All the best for your next steps – I look forward to hearing / seeing / reading you then! And many thanks for your work which was excellent!”

Mark’s departure comes after it was revealed Newsnight was facing a fight to stay on television screens after losing half of its viewers, 30 staff and having more than £7 million cut from its budget.

It was reported last year that the long-running show would lose its dedicated reporters, be shortened by 10 minutes and drop its investigative films to focus on studio-based debates.

At the time BBC News and Current Affairs CEO Deborah Turness said the broadcaster was “in a tough financial climate”, and had to make “some difficult choices” as audiences switch from TV to online news.

Jonathan Aspinwall was appointed as the show’s new editor and the broadcaster said he will “lead Newsnight as it evolves into a debate, discussion and an interview-based programme”.

Via

Leave a Comment

MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL MlL